Music in Film

23 Aug

By Littlebells

Music is an integral part of human life and nature.  We hear it in the sound of trees blowing in the breeze, water cascading down a mountain, insects buzzing all around, and the tones and workings of the human body. But how early does the first musical instrument date? Hard to say, but in Germany a flute carved from bone 35,000 years old was discovered giving evidence that music has been with us from the very beginning.[1]

Luciano Pavarotti said,

“If children are not introduced to music at an early age, I believe something fundamental is actually being taken from them.”[2]

Music is used to evoke emotions and inner feelings to create a greater overall experience.  The human body responds quite effectively to music.   Breathing, body temperature, heart rate, cerebral stimulation and memory, mood, physical coordination, and an overall sense of well-being are altered by music.  One song can cause your body to slow down, where another makes you want to jump off your couch and fly around the room.[3]

Looking at music from a film standpoint, composers create pieces that will stimulate and heighten our emotions. Once our emotions have been tagged, our body’s physical response is immediately altered. Depending on the quality and nature of the composition blood pressure may rise or fall, heart rate may decrease or accelerate, and emotions can range from end of the spectrum to the other.[4]  We may not remember what was said, but we remember how the movie made us feel, in part due to the score.

1933, Max Steiner composed the first original score for King Kong.  Scores originally started out as reinforcement for a film but eventually went on to become a major support of movie characters and story lines. The 1930s and 40s were an age of symphonic music.  By the 1950s jazz, most commonly used in musicals, was introduced and opened a wider range of contemporary sounds.  Fewer musicians were needed which made it less costly for studios.  The 1960s continued jazz but also introduced the use of rock soundtracks.  The 1970s were spent perfecting this craft and the 80s and 90s gave way to the synthesizer.[5] What is it about music that has made it such a useful tool in over 70 years of films?

Some of the most well-known and honored composers of film history are John Williams, Ennio Moriconne, and Hans Zimmer.  Williams, a master of theme songs, won several Academy Awards for Best Original Score for the following: Star Wars, Jaws, and Schindler’s List.  He is also renowned for Superman and E.T. 

Ennio Morricone has been nominated for 5 Academy Awards.  He won 5 BAFTA Awards for original music. These included The Mission, Once Upon A Time in America, and The Untouchables.[6]  Other great works include The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly, Bugsy, and City of Joy.

Hans Zimmer has a large body of current scores in many of our popular and mainstream movies.  He has been nominated for 7 Oscars, with one win, for: The Lion King, Rain Man, The Preacher’s Wife, AS Good As It Gets, The Prince of Egypt, The Thin Red Line, Gladiator, Sherlock Holmes, and Inception.  He also is the mastermind behind The Dark Night, Angels & Demons, and The Pirates of the Caribbean.[7]

These composers are not just distinguished for their impressive bodies of work, but for the emotions they stirred within us allowing us to connect to the story.  How many of their movies involuntarily start you humming a theme song?  How has music in a film affected your connection to the story and characters?  Would films have the same power if there were no musical composition?  What scores have been most memorable for you as a viewer?

Please join our discussion Tuesday 8/23/2011@7pE/12UTC

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133 Responses to “Music in Film”

  1. Parisienne August 23, 2011 at 6:36 PM #

    LittleBells,

    Awesome Article! One of my favs is the Hannibal soundtrack.

    • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 6:57 PM #

      Hi Littlebells, great topic. See you soon.

      • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 6:58 PM #

        Paris,

        Don’t think I ever heard the Hannibal sound track. I think I’ll try to find it.

      • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 6:59 PM #

        HI CR!

        • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:00 PM #

          Hi LB.

  2. Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 6:58 PM #

    Hi Paris!

    Thanks! 😉 Any favorite moments in Hannibal? What is it that you liked about the soundtrack?

    • Parisienne August 23, 2011 at 7:08 PM #

      I don’t really have anything favorite about the soundtrack. I just liked the “feel” of the film.

  3. Parisienne August 23, 2011 at 7:02 PM #

    Hi All!

    CR, here is my fav soundtrack from the Hannibal film.

    • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:05 PM #

      I was just going to post that!

      • Parisienne August 23, 2011 at 7:10 PM #

        as i have said before and will say to you many times in the future. “great minds think alike.” 🙂

        • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:13 PM #

          🙂

          • ozzie20 August 23, 2011 at 7:29 PM #

            That is a beautiful piece of music! I’ve never heard it before.

        • Open Book August 23, 2011 at 8:20 PM #

          LOVE THIS Paris….. U can’t tell me this beautiful music is freakin scary in this film. But when u listen to it without watching the film u think how peaceful.

    • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:19 PM #

      That was really beautiful. If I get the chance I hope we discuss the classical versus not classical issue pretty throughly.

      • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:33 PM #

        When you say not classical, do you mean soundtrack?

        • comic relief August 24, 2011 at 11:45 AM #

          BWAHAHAHA, I’m not sure what I meant.

          I think I meant borrowing from classical composers versus using composed music from the living.

          I’ll try to be more clear.

          • Littlebells August 24, 2011 at 6:41 PM #

            That would be a great discussion! Would you like us to do a music column on that?

  4. Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:06 PM #

    Paris did an experiment with me and we tested the whole “heart rate” idea behind music and it works! I had her listen to Superman’s theme and then Claire De Lune.

    • Parisienne August 23, 2011 at 7:09 PM #

      yes i was the guinea pig. Start, stop and all that. It was quite fun.

  5. Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:07 PM #

    CR, going back to your comment in the other post, why do you think classical music/opera make such great scores for film?

    • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:12 PM #

      Thanks LB,

      I do want to return to the subject.

      Paris you and LB brought up the subject of using classical music in your Opera and Mainstream Movies sellections. I made some remark about how an opera may already be a proven dramatic device (not necessarily a bad a bad thing). Do you agree? Could possibly agree with me or wonder whether it’s cheating?

      • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:24 PM #

        …I think I’m playing devil’s advocate….

        • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:26 PM #

          NO that’s good!

          • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:27 PM #

            …thanks, now I feel better….

      • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:25 PM #

        I do believe Opera’s are already proven to be dramatic. I don’t think it’s cheating, per se, but for me it enhances the dramatics of a scene. Another film that used an opera was “Philadelphia”. There is a scene in which Tom Hanks’s character is listening to La Mamma Morta and he is describing the story. The song used within the context of his story, I thought was beautifully done and emphasizes Andrew’s despair.

        • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:34 PM #

          Wow, after that, I’m pretty speechless.

          Great illustration LB.

          • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:38 PM #

            I think it really comes down to choosing the right song for the scene. I’m glad you enjoyed that clip, CR.

            As for the choice of Sull’ Aria used in Shawshank redemption, it wasn’t necessarily the underscore of the scene, but used in the context of the scene. Something beautiful, lovely and hopeful given to a group of men stuck in a sad, lonely, horrible place.

            • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 8:13 PM #

              I’m obviously one of those audience members who just let’s the whole musical contribution just flow over them; and rarely thinks to go back and analyze how I was moved.

  6. Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:08 PM #

    Yes absolutely. I was amazed at how much work of Zimmer’s I was familiar. I had no idea he had done so many famous movies!

  7. Open Book August 23, 2011 at 7:08 PM #

    Hi Everyone-

    LB- this is such a beautiful topic and article. My favorites by Zimmer are Rainman, Sherlock Holmes and Inception only because they are so different yet defines a scene without being to forward or present. Does that make sense?

  8. Parisienne August 23, 2011 at 7:09 PM #

    Hi Open Book! how are you?

    • Open Book August 24, 2011 at 3:55 PM #

      Hi Paris-

      O.k. here is another favorite from this year. This soundtrack is from Hanna The Chemical Brothers I must post. They also did some stuff for Black Swan enjoy!

      • Open Book August 24, 2011 at 4:02 PM #

  9. Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:12 PM #

    Here is one of my favorite movies and scenes by Williams. (unfortunately it gets cut off too soon.) I think he did a beautiful job of translating the emotion of the characters into the music.

    • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:16 PM #

      I’m not sure anyone uses sound the was speilberg does.

      • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:27 PM #

        I couldn’t agree more CR.

        BTW: HELLO EVERYONE!!!! 🙂

  10. comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:13 PM #

    On the other hand the use of classical music such as with Strauss’s Blue Danube waltz in Stanly Kubrick’s 2001 One a space Odyssey can sometimes make scenes from the movie seem far more significant. This seems to be apparent in the trailer.

    http://www.imdb.com/video/imdb/vi2388329497/

    • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:14 PM #

      Speaking of Stanly Kubrick I can’t tell whether he was sort of a snob about it. Speaking of 2001: A Space Odyssey, he said:

      “However good our best film composers may be, they are not a Beethoven, a Mozart or a Brahms. Why use music which is less good when there is such a multitude of great orchestral music available from the past and from our own time? When you are editing a film, it’s very helpful to be able to try out different pieces of music to see how they work with the scene…Well, with a little more care and thought, these temporary tracks can become the final score.”

      When you listen this comment doesn’t appear to be demeaning to film composers but I can’t imagine the first line making some film composers uncomfortable.

      • Parisienne August 23, 2011 at 7:27 PM #

        CR,

        IMO I don’t think it would make them to uncomfortable because everyone is different although i don’t think the music of composers today is not as good as the classical composers. Its a different time and era.

        • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:42 PM #

          Paris,

          I don’t understand; your first statement lets Kubrick off the hook, then you somewhat agree with him, then you rationalize the misunderstanding as a time period difference.

          Paris, you’re a master politician!!!! “Touche'”

          I guess I can accept that, though I think I’m still trying to organize the whole thing in my head. ;(

          • Parisienne August 23, 2011 at 7:48 PM #

            I knew i had it in me! Law School here i come!

          • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:49 PM #

            I’m sure there’s a diplomatic chair at the UN that needs to be filled. I’m going to start sending in a nominations

            • Parisienne August 23, 2011 at 7:56 PM #

              i shall accept your nomination. 🙂

      • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:30 PM #

        I can see his point, and yet at the same time I do believe we have extremely talented composers. Yes, you cannot compete with BEethoven, Mozart, Tchaikovsky, Brahms, etc….they set the standard, but we should encourage others who are gifted with the talent of music to create the symphonies in their mind. I can’t play an instrument to save my life–well, maybe spoons–so I am enamored with someone who can take something that is in their mind, put it to paper and then allow others to give it life.

        • Parisienne August 23, 2011 at 7:42 PM #

          well you can’t compete with them because classical composers were not composing for films. That’s how they made their living.

          • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:44 PM #

            That’s true. I think there was a little more blood, sweat and tears.

    • ozzie20 August 23, 2011 at 7:15 PM #

      Hello everyone!

      Brilliant article LB!

      • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:20 PM #

        Hi, Ozzie.

        • ozzie20 August 23, 2011 at 7:24 PM #

          Hi CR!

  11. comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:26 PM #

    Hmmmmmmmm,

    …I’m assumin some big posts are a commin….

    • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:30 PM #

      yes! haha!

  12. Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:35 PM #

    When watching films, are you moved more by instrumental, soundtrack, or both? What does music in a film specifically do for you as a viewer?

    • ozzie20 August 23, 2011 at 8:00 PM #

      Both for me. The music has to heighten the feelings the movie is portraying for me.

  13. Open Book August 23, 2011 at 7:38 PM #

    O.k. this is my one of my favorites. CR it was only a matter of time. LOL!!!

    • Open Book August 23, 2011 at 7:40 PM #

      And second

      • ozzie20 August 23, 2011 at 7:54 PM #

        I love this song! It’s called “Clubbed to Death” by Rob Dougan. He has an interesting video for it.

        • Open Book August 23, 2011 at 7:56 PM #

          o.k. here is the third. I’m done! LOL!!!

        • Open Book August 23, 2011 at 8:10 PM #

          Ozzie I like his work. Another great one from this soundtrack is “Mindfield.” o.k. I’m really done I can write a thesis on this soundtrack. LOL!!

          • ozzie20 August 23, 2011 at 8:13 PM #

            Lol! 🙂

          • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:22 PM #

            OB, it just goes to show how tremendous music is in our life. And when used in the correct context of a film, our emotions can’t help but go up a notch.

            • comic relief August 24, 2011 at 12:19 PM #

              Since Ozzie brought it up. Here’s “Clubbed to Death” by Rob Dougan.

    • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:42 PM #

      OB!

      That was fantastic! At moments I turned off the volume solely as experimentation. Going back to the affect music has on the human body, I found my heart rate speeding up while watching the scene with music than without. The music captured an element that no costume, CGI, set, prop, or facial expression ever could. IMO. That’s worth about 2 grains of salt. 😉

      • Open Book August 23, 2011 at 8:07 PM #

        ITA! I like this soundtrack because it so hot and cold but . It raises and cools u down if that makes sense. I’m not a musician so the technical terms I don’t know. I just know what I feel when I watch these scenes with this music.

        • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:27 PM #

          And what you “feel” is more important than terminology. 😉

    • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:45 PM #

      Hahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahashahahahahahahahahahahahjahahaha!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

      • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:55 PM #

        I’m so jealous, and I can’t leave the post…

        darn you OB 🙂

  14. Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:53 PM #

    I’m trying to pinpoint when movies transitioned from using little scoring in a film to major scoring. I could be completely wrong, but I feel that we use more music now than we did in the 40s and 50s. Anyone, anyone? Bueller? Bueller?

  15. Open Book August 23, 2011 at 7:53 PM #

    Hi-Paris & Ozzie

    Hope u are well.

    • ozzie20 August 23, 2011 at 7:55 PM #

      Hello OB! I’m ok, how are you?

  16. Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:55 PM #

    Moving away for a moment from film scores, what about soundtracks? One of my favorite soundtracks come from Ferris Bueller’s Days Off and The Breakfast Club. Child of the 80s, what can I say…..

    • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:58 PM #

      “The March of the Swivelheads” by The English Beat. I think it captures the scene great!

      • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 7:59 PM #

        (Literally bobbing in my chair playing air drums)

        • Open Book August 23, 2011 at 8:15 PM #

          This is soooooo not fair. LOVE THIS scene and music u are AWESOME!!!

          • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:19 PM #

            This is one of those movies that if you don’t own it, you are nuts and completely missing out on life! haha!

      • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 8:05 PM #

        Great find LB.

        We could talk about this clip all night.

        Too bad we don’t have more time.

        • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:20 PM #

          I know, CR, believe me I know. Every song seems to go well with every hilarious and serious scene in this film.

  17. comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:56 PM #

    Love this conversation…

    If I mess things up by posting this next post, please just post another clip!!!!!!!!!!!

    LB, forgiven me but I have to ask…

    • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 7:58 PM #

      “…but eventually went on to become a major support of movie characters and story lines.”

      LB,

      I’m really glad you said that above statement. There are some movies from the 1980’s that actually freeze me in my tracks in regard to hating the sound track. I know the “Top Gun” sound track was very influential in many ways, but I think I hate that one more than I like to admit. I have nothing against Kenny Loggins; but I think Tony Scott did him a great disservice by using him to try to make air force jets seem sexy.

      I’m not really commenting on the quality of the music as much as the attitude is unpleasing to me. The attempt to sale war machines, which are of course are very necessary, seems really dumb to me.
      Unfortunately I will always associate those dog fight scenes with Kenny Loggins, and that “….Danger Zone” song may not have been written with those scenes in mind at all.

      • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:04 PM #

        HAHAHAHAHAHA! *snort* and I just posted some favorite movies and song from the 80s! But I have to agree with you on this one. I got to :44 seconds because it sounds so completely melodramatic I want to puke. You’re right, not every score or soundtrack or song for that matter will do a movie justice. It really takes talent to coordinate songs with scenes and not make it seem ridiculous or cheesy.

        • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 8:06 PM #

          Excellent use of the word “puke”.

          • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:12 PM #

            yeah, my vocabulary went down 30 pts. listening to that! 🙂

  18. Parisienne August 23, 2011 at 8:05 PM #

    I’m going to go. Have a good night!

    • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 8:07 PM #

      Night Paris.

    • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:13 PM #

      Night night Paris!

    • Open Book August 23, 2011 at 8:13 PM #

      Goodnight Paris!

      • ozzie20 August 23, 2011 at 8:14 PM #

        Night Paris!

  19. Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:17 PM #

    Ok, I’m going to bring this up and probably will regret it, but for those of us who saw The Twilight movies, what did you think of the soundtrack?

    Also, do you think composers today create music from a genuine place within their heart or just to fill an obligation? Hmm…that did not come out quite right, but hopefully you get what I was trying to organize in my brain.

    • Open Book August 23, 2011 at 8:26 PM #

      Well I like the first films soundtrack the best.

      • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 8:29 PM #

        By far one of the best clips.

      • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:34 PM #

        I agree. I honestly don’t remember anything from Eclipse or NM except this one and I think it was used very well in the context of the scene: (forgive me it’s the best one I could find)

        • Open Book August 24, 2011 at 4:25 PM #

          Great selection LB!!!

    • comic relief August 23, 2011 at 8:28 PM #

      Great question, I liked one and two. Hardwicke was fantastic, I thought Chris Weitz did a great following her,didn’t care too much for Slade and he had a music video background just like Hardwicke.

      Talent in that arena is alot harder to comeby than I think most people give credit for.

      • comic relief August 24, 2011 at 10:07 AM #

        LB,

        Actually by comparison, Weitz wasn’t that good.

        What I meant to say was Hardwicke really understood that as a film Twilight needed the kind of heart that previous Summit Films or other vampire movies never had. Surprisingly unrevealed from the Harry potter franchise, Hardwicke found that soul in the environment of Forks and specifically the soulful music of Pattinson.

        Think of all of the vampire movies before and since. The Gates, True Blood, Vampire Diaries, Fright Night,.. and many more; they have the same kinds of lifeless, undead fanged ghouls that turned on boys but did nothing for girls. RP supplied the longing, vulnerability, and regret that just wasn’t available from the rest of the cast. You had the impression that Edward actually lost something that he was desperately trying to regain.

        Fueled by Summit’s angry attempts to erase Hardwicke’s success and their past film failures, the series has been an soulless afterschool spectacle that only the American pie director could facilitate. He conceived of Jacob and his Supercuts boy band hair cut,………………… but I don’t want to get off track.

        Here’s another Pattinson musical contribution that did not make the movie.

        • comic relief August 24, 2011 at 10:09 AM #

          Here is another RP background contribution that did make the movie, minus the scene from the film. It’s from the climax that sold that movie.

          • comic relief August 24, 2011 at 10:22 AM #

            I thought the song had other video. That was an extreme accident. Sorry, Youtube is a beast.

            Well, they were errr pictures from the franchise…

            (…..Total embarassment)

            • Open Book August 24, 2011 at 4:21 PM #

              Raised eyebrow……..Hmmm. Very soulful.

              • Open Book August 24, 2011 at 4:22 PM #

                Just close eyes and listen no need to look. That’s how u get over YouTube hickups. LOL!!!

                • Littlebells August 24, 2011 at 6:43 PM #

                  haha! So true!

    • Open Book August 23, 2011 at 8:31 PM #

      That’s a tough Q about composers. I think when u can only imagine a particular scene with that particular melody then that’s when u know it’s genuine. Does that make sense?

      • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:35 PM #

        Yes, absolutely 100%!!!! There are people and things in life that when they come together it is the ideal and perfect match and anything else would be sub par at best.

  20. Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:24 PM #

    Everyone,

    Is there a theme song in particular that you are drawn to? Please post a clip so we can all enjoy!

    • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:37 PM #

      • Open Book August 23, 2011 at 8:48 PM #

        U have really put the cherry on top! Perfect can’t top this.

    • ozzie20 August 23, 2011 at 8:41 PM #

      Yea, we’d be on all night if I really got going into this! There’s just too many for me! 🙂

      • Open Book August 23, 2011 at 8:43 PM #

        LOL!!

        • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:47 PM #

          🙂 I got Paris to fly around the room listening to Superman!

    • Open Book August 23, 2011 at 8:42 PM #

      Yes! This is short and sweet yet poignant, For CR!!

      • comic relief August 24, 2011 at 10:51 AM #

        Pretty woman was such a weird seemingly conventional movie. Basically this prostitute meets her Prince Charmimg, a movie that never would have been so endearing if not for Julia Roberts. Imagine another actress in the role and there wouldn’t have been nearly the humor, joy, and fearlessness (despite circumstances) that Roberts contributed.

        Why is it so easy not to see the sleeze in this dramedy? This story gave so many people faith they could overcome hardship in their own backgrounds. Even the men could unfreeze their hearts.

        The only hint that something more vulnerable or special was going on in this dramedy was hinted at in this little song. Like the entire movie, “Falling” was unexpectedly sophisticated, precious, hopeful, and hinted at a transformation that was internal to her and his character that was completely missing from the script. In that way this musical piece wasn’t just background, it was exposition. I revealed what the actors weren’t given lines to express.

        What a great way to round out the clips, OB.

        • comic relief August 24, 2011 at 10:52 AM #

          Here’s more of the song undisturbed by the movie. Again thanks OB.

          • Lurker August 24, 2011 at 9:09 PM #

            I Love this song! It makes me smile.

            • comic relief August 25, 2011 at 12:51 PM #

              LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,LURKER,
              🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂 🙂

  21. comic relief August 23, 2011 at 8:34 PM #

    Great topic and discussion LB.

    Unfortunately I have to go.

    Bye all.

    • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:38 PM #

      No worries!

      I will check back later if you have any further questions or thoughts. 🙂

      • ozzie20 August 23, 2011 at 8:42 PM #

        Bye CR!

  22. Open Book August 23, 2011 at 8:46 PM #

    Everyone!

    I have to go. LB this was such a great discussion it’s brightened my day! Thank U!

    • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:47 PM #

      You are very, very welcome! I’m glad it made you smile! I’m glad we have our music column!!!!!

      • ozzie20 August 23, 2011 at 8:50 PM #

        Bye OB!

  23. Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:49 PM #

    Thank you everyone for tonight’s discussion. I love music and I know you do as well. please feel free to carry this conversation into our music column. 🙂

    • ozzie20 August 23, 2011 at 9:02 PM #

      Bye LB, have fun!

  24. BlueEyes August 23, 2011 at 8:55 PM #

    Hi guys, I’m new here, but I just can not omit the occasion to post my most favorite soundtrack of all time.
    This man just broke my heart with his music!

    You have a wonderful site and wonderful article’s authors!

    • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:58 PM #

      Hi Blue Eyes!

      Welcome!!! Yes, Gladiator is phenomenal. Great choice. Hans Zimmer really evoked quite some emotion with this score.

    • Littlebells August 23, 2011 at 8:59 PM #

      Every other week we will have a music column, so please come back and listen!

    • ozzie20 August 23, 2011 at 9:01 PM #

      Welcome BlueEyes! So proud of you for having the courage to post! 🙂

      Gladiator has a beautiful soundtrack, so I’m glad you brought it up!

    • Parisienne August 24, 2011 at 2:23 AM #

      BlueEyes,

      Welcome! Thank you for posting. Its a pleasure to have you. 🙂

    • Open Book August 24, 2011 at 3:44 PM #

      Welcome BlueEyes……Sorry I missed u. ITA Zimmer is phenomenal.

  25. Open Book August 24, 2011 at 4:29 PM #

    This is another favorite of mine. This is from “Inside Man” o.k. I’m done…..Love this topic LB can u tell. LOL!!

  26. Littlebells August 24, 2011 at 6:45 PM #

    I think I opened Pandora’s box!!!! hahaha!!!! 🙂 Great clips! I think this is definitely a discussion we should come and revisit. We can bring our favorite pieces and share what it is about the music that has drawn us in. Thank you so much for sharing!

    OB, I agree that it is a beautiful subject. Thank you for letting me share this with all of you.

  27. Lurker August 24, 2011 at 8:56 PM #

    I missed last night’s discussion but I had one I wanted to contribute.
    This soundtrack recently captured me, I had to buy it.The music really permeated this movie.
    Coco before Chanel

    • Littlebells August 24, 2011 at 10:39 PM #

      I’m not one to go out and buy anything: music, book, art unless it moves me. What was it about this soundtrack that captured you? Also how did the music enhance the film for you?

      • Lurker August 24, 2011 at 10:44 PM #

        Honestly, it was soothing, calm and light. It was in a strange way peaceful. I really think it sort of blended in with the movie nothing about it was abrupt (movie or music). It just left me with a great feeling and I thought it was an excellent piece of music to have on while working.

        • Littlebells August 24, 2011 at 10:47 PM #

          🙂 I love seamless blends of music and film.

          • comic relief August 25, 2011 at 12:56 PM #

            Super Ditto, so glad to have you back Lurker.

  28. Lurker August 24, 2011 at 10:33 PM #

    Just thought I would leave one more.

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