Breaking Asian Films Into the Mainstream

4 May


By Ozzie

After seeing 13 Assassins on our New Movie Hot Seat poll, this foreign film appeared as though it could be a summer hit. What could be the key to achieving that success? After taking a closer look. It turns out it was produced by Toshiaki Nakazawa, who won an Oscar for best foreign film (Departures 2009) and Jeremy Thomas who has a talent for breaking Asian films into the mainstream market. The Last Emperor, Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence are just two of his well know break throughs. Also, it stars Koji Yakusho, who was in Silk (2007), Babel (2006) and perhaps his best-known role in the Western world, Nobu in Memoirs of a Geisha (2005). That’s a pretty good start! So what is the movie about?

 13 Assassins opened in theatres on April 29th, 2011 and is a remake of the film Jusan-nin no shikaku made in 1963 and based on a true story. The film is set in the final years of Feudal Japan. The Feudal period lasted from 1185A.D.-1868A.D.[1] During this era people were divided into four groups. Peasants were the lowest of the social rank, next up were the samurai, who were the warriors that made up the army. Further up the social ladder were the Daimyo. They were the rulers of their province and were very powerful as they had control over the military and economics of their area. Finally, at the top of the pile was The Emperor, a figurehead with little power and the Shogun, who was the leader of the military and had the most amount of power.[2]

The story starts with Daimyo, the sadistic Lord Naritsugu (Goro Inagaki) who is a murderer and a rapist, being called to the Imperial capital to be made a second Shogun.[3]  However, his half-brother, also a Shogun, is not impressed. He may have protected his brother in the past but now that Naritsugu is moving up the social ladder and is loose cannon, he’s had enough. He orders his loyal assistance, Sir Doi (Mikijjro Hari) to find a way to kill his brother quietly.[4] Sir Doi hires a samurai Shinzaemon Shimada (Koji Yakusho), to lead the attack with 12 other Samurai assassins.[5] It will not be easy because a strong 200 men army surrounds Lord Narritsugu.[6]

So if 13 Assassins wet’s your appetite, are there any other well-known Jidaigeki (period drama’s usually set in the Feudal era) films?  Yes there is!

Seven Samurai (1954) – When bandits raid a village, then make plans to come back later and steal the last of the crops harvested. The villagers reach out to a veteran Samurai, who enlists the help of six other Samurai, to teach the villages how to fight in return for food.  It was nominated for two Oscars and three Baftas.  The film The Magnificent Seven (1960) was adapted from this movie and it went on to win an Oscar for Best Music, Scoring of a Drama or Comedy Picture. [7]

Throne of Blood (1957) – A Japanese version of Shakespeare’s Macbeth.  It takes place in Medieval Japan, with two Samurai commanders (Washizu and Miki) are returning to their Lord’s castle after defeating his enemies; they encounter a spirit who tells them their futures. When they arrive at the castle, the first part of the prophecy comes true. Washizu’s wife then pushes him to make the second part come true, no matter what the cost is.

Ran (1985) – Based on Samurai legends and Shakespeare’s King Lear, Lord Hidetora Ichimonji decides to abdicate and divides the land between his three sons. The two eldest brothers plot to strip everything left in the Lord’s procession, the youngest brother warns him but is banished. Soon the Lord realises his son was right. The movie was nominated for four Oscars, winning one for Best Costume Design. It also was nominated for one Cesar Awards (France), one Golden Globe and five Baftas, winning two for Best Foreign Language Film and Best Make Up Artist.[8]

Shogun Assassin (1980) – A paranoid Shogun attempts to kill his Samurai warrior, despite the Samurai’s loyal serving of him. He sends his ninjas to kill him but they failed and killed his wife instead. The Samurai swears to avenge her death and so sets of with his son on a quest for revenge. The film is mentioned in Kill Bill 2, in the scene where The Bride watches it with her daughter at bedtime.[9]

The Last Samurai (2003) – If you prefer big Hollywood films, this one is for you! It stars Tom Cruise as an American Civil War veteran (Nathan Algren) who is sent to Japan to train its troops in modern warfare.  Despite his attempt to train them, they are still sent into battle still inexperienced in the new weapons. A shot taken too early sees them overrun by the enemies while reloading. Algren stays and fights bravely with his troops, but after being badly wounded, he is captured by the enemy. His courage to stay and fight saves his life. While being taken care of Algren slowly swayed by the Samurai ways and soon he has to make a difficult choice as to which side he will fight for. It was nominated for four Oscars and three Golden Globes.[10]

  Please join us for a discussion: Thursday 5/5/2011@7pE/12UTC

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136 Responses to “Breaking Asian Films Into the Mainstream”

  1. Littlebells May 4, 2011 at 11:30 AM #

    Ozzie, thank you for the great summary! I am actually very interested in seeing 13 Assassins. I don’t know when I will find the time, but it looks very interesting. I remember seeing The Last Samurai, and enjoyed it. It’s been 8 years so maybe I will put it on my netflix que.

    Which ones have you seen and did you get a chance to see 13 Assassins?

  2. Parisienne May 4, 2011 at 11:31 PM #

    Ozzie,

    Great Article! Its extremely informative. I enjoy Asian films very much because I’m interested in their culture. Did you get a chance to see Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon? Its a very good film and has great cinematography.

    • Littlebells May 4, 2011 at 11:43 PM #

      That was my first real Japanese film and I thought it was fantastic!

      • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 6:18 PM #

        Thank you! I don’t think I’ve seen any of them. Unless they were on early hours of the morning and I watched them half asleep! I have seen Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and it has amazing cinematography. I’ve also watched House of Flying Daggers and that too is very good and has excellent cinematography too. I think they’re both Chinese films. I’ll have to look that up. 🙂

        Anyway, this is a scene from House of Flying Daggers. The actress is playing a blind person…..I can’t say anymore because it’s a spoiler! 🙂

  3. comic relief May 5, 2011 at 1:35 AM #

    Ozzie,

    I have a question. I used to love Films from Asia until I became sensitive because I’m ignorant as to whether I was watching pop trash or not. Obviously my appetite for kitschy stuff is enormous so why should I distinguish or discriminate? So I was wondering is there any criteria for watching or seeking out these movies that I may not be aware of.

    When I was a teen I loved everything from the old Bruce Lee era. My friend and I used to wear those shirts with the Mandarin collars all the time out of solidarity.

    Years later, like Paris said movies like “Crouching Tiger…” pulled me back into theatres. I saw the “House of Flying Daggers”, “Curse of the Golden Flower”, “Hero”, “The Forbidden Kingdom”, etc.

    Feel odd asking because I’m sure I will probably keep watching regardless of the criteria. Is there a criterion for distinguishing the higher quality films in Asia?

    • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 6:24 PM #

      Honestly, I don’t know. I’m just scratching the surface when it comes to the art and history of films but I’ll have a look around and see what I can find. 🙂

  4. Open Book May 5, 2011 at 6:58 PM #

    Welcome everyone to our discussion tonight. Please join in on the discussion.

    • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 6:59 PM #

      Hello all!

      • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:03 PM #

        Hi Ozzie-

        Great article I’m very excited u chose asian films to write about. There are so many I have enjoyed watching over the years and I’m not quite sure what’s good or not. So I’m hoping to learn some things tonight.

        • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 7:17 PM #

          Ditto.

    • Lurker May 5, 2011 at 7:04 PM #

      Howdee!

      • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:06 PM #

        Hi!

      • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:06 PM #

        Howdee do to u! LOL!

  5. Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:00 PM #

    Hi!

    • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:03 PM #

      Hi Paris!

      How are u?

      • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:06 PM #

        Hi Open Book!

        i’m good how are you?

        • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:06 PM #

          Hi Paris!

          • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:29 PM #

            Hi Ozzie!

        • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:08 PM #

          Not bad!

  6. Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:01 PM #

    Did u know that Crouching Tiger was made on a 17 million dollar budget? I thought how amazing given what some films cost today.

    • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:02 PM #

      I did not know that but its an amazing film.

      • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:05 PM #

        Yeah! I know I was amazed.

        Ozzie what was 13 assassins production budget?

        • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:08 PM #

          Roughly 20 million, I think. I’ll pull up the press release and see if there’s something in that.

          • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:11 PM #

            Nothing in the press release. Oh well it was worth having a look!

          • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:12 PM #

            Really? Wow that’s still pretty low compared to American film production budgets.

    • Lurker May 5, 2011 at 7:06 PM #

      I agree that is shockingly low.

      • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:10 PM #

        Yeah! It was the highest grossing foreign film in America’s history. What do u think about that?

        • Lurker May 5, 2011 at 7:13 PM #

          Well there was a lot of buzz about it and I think people went to see it because of the buzz. But it was a great movie.

          • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:20 PM #

            Why do u think asian films like Crouching Tiger and other’s cost so little to produce?

            • Lurker May 5, 2011 at 7:25 PM #

              At risk of being politically incorrect, I wonder if it has anything to do with the wage structure in the U.s. with the unions vs overseas (i.e. cheaper labor)

              • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:32 PM #

                I was thinking low wage labor as well.

  7. comic relief May 5, 2011 at 7:05 PM #

    Hi everyone.

    • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:05 PM #

      Hi CR!

      How are u?

      • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 7:15 PM #

        Good.

    • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:06 PM #

      Hi CR!

      • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:09 PM #

        Hello CR!

        • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 7:15 PM #

          Great article and so well researched.

          • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:17 PM #

            Thank you!

      • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 7:12 PM #

        Hi.

  8. comic relief May 5, 2011 at 7:14 PM #

    About my earlier question I was not trying to be a snob.

    I think one of the reasons I feel uncomfortable with my apetite for Kung fu movies is I have heard Jackie Chan and Jet li complain about always being asked to do these films exclusively. I guess this made me feel a lot more was out there in Asia.

    I think I see Michelle Yoh, (of Croaching Tiger fame) in many places other than those films.

    • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:24 PM #

      Oh I knew that! I didn’t think it sounded snobbish at all! I agree it must be frustrating to be consistantly asked to star in a narrow catagory. From the quick look I’ve had, history plays a part in the criteria.

  9. Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:16 PM #

    Ozzie-

    What’s the reason martial arts subject matter always the choice for marketing mainstream films outside of asia?

    • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:30 PM #

      I think maybe because action is something that is universal, something we all can understand despite the language barrier or time period. Also, matial arts is likened to what the western films(cowboys, not part of the world) mean to the Western world. I suppose it’s natural then to follow similar marketing strategies to increase popularity.

      I hope that makes sense!

      • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:39 PM #

        Yes! It makes perfect sense and very logical conclusion to draw. I have always wondered because I know Asian artistry is so dynamic I wondered about it’s diversity. I would hate to think they were not evolving in order to cater to western appetites.

  10. Littlebells May 5, 2011 at 7:18 PM #

    Hi everyone! On a Playdate with the hubs so I will check in later. Thanks CR and Ozzie!

    • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 7:20 PM #

      See you soon.

    • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:22 PM #

      Hi LB!

      Sound’s so romantic have fun!

      • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:24 PM #

        See you later LB!

  11. Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:25 PM #

    Paris-

    U watch a lot of foreign films. What are some of your favorite asian films?

    • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:26 PM #

      Bruce Lee films for starters. Bruce Lee will always be number one for me.

      • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 7:29 PM #

        We’ll get along well, (not that i did not already know this).

        • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:30 PM #

          LOL.

          • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:33 PM #

            I like all the ones mentioned in the comments but I’m sure there are several others I like that I haven’t been able to catch the title. Foreign films are usually aired in the early morning here.

        • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:38 PM #

          Be like water my friend. 🙂

    • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:28 PM #

      I do watch foreign films but not any asian ones lately.

      • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:43 PM #

        Paris & CR!

        o.k. I’m going to admit I have only seen 2 Bruce Lee films. Which one’s are your favorite?

        • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:44 PM #

          Enter the Dragon.

          • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:49 PM #

            Oh! I love love this one….. Now Lee really opens up a can in this one. LOL!!

            • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:51 PM #

              LOL yes he does. 🙂

              • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 8:08 PM #

                I like Enter the Dragon too. He does a powerful performance in it.

                • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 8:18 PM #

                  I also like the movie about his life. Dragon: The Bruce Lee Story.

                  • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 8:22 PM #

                    UH OH. I think we might need an intervention. I’m smelling a “Bruce Lee freak”. I understand because I used to be one.

                    • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 8:31 PM #

                      Oh, yes! That was on tv the other week!

          • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 7:52 PM #

            Agreed.

            • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:56 PM #

              CR! What Bruce Lee film is your favorite?

              • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 8:14 PM #

                Sorry, I said “Enter the Dragon” also.

  12. Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:32 PM #

    Since we are discussing Asian films. Ozzie, are you familiar with Bruce Lee and if so, what impact do you think he has had on the films that you have mentioned in your article?

    • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:40 PM #

      I think Bruce Lee made alot of people aware of Asian films. Breaking through the barrier has allowed more foreign films access, in my opinion. Opened the flood gates so to speak. I think he made it more acceptable too. How, I’m not to sure but I think it was because he was a very charismatic man that people can’t but stop and listen to what he says.

      • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:41 PM #

        I agree.

  13. Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:37 PM #

    Ozzie,

    Do you think Asian film stars are still sterotyped typed today? (Jet Li and Jackie Chan) and why does that sterotype still exist?

    • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:44 PM #

      Unfortunately I do. Dev Patel has spoken recently about it.(in the last few years but it’s recent on the time scale we’re talking about)He said the roles weren’t there and if the were they’re all stereotypical. I have no idea why it is still like that. It doesn’t bother me to see an actor of another race take an “out of the mold” role.

    • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 7:44 PM #

      This is another interpretation question; Jackie Chan is famous here and in the east. Is this some of what you meant when you spoke of mainstreaming Asian films. Or what similarity to this dialogue do you see.

    • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:45 PM #

      Good Q Paris!

      • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 7:48 PM #

        thank you.

        • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 8:04 PM #

          Yes, I guess so. He to has become a sort of “ambassador” for the genre now. However, I think Jackie Chan speak to a younger audience. He’s done alot of children movies, creating more awareness. That’s a good thing.

          I hope that’s what you meant. I’m getting a bit flustered here with the crashing!

  14. Lurker May 5, 2011 at 7:48 PM #

    All, I’m having some connetivity challenges today since they have been digging in my neighbor hood. I’m here and then I’m not.! Sorry.

    • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 7:54 PM #

      No problem!

      Lurker what are some of your favorite Asian films and why?

      • Lurker May 5, 2011 at 7:57 PM #

        I enjoyed Memoirs of a Geisha partly because it provided a view of what a Geisha really went thru and has a historical influence to it. I thought it was acted superbly too.

        • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 8:04 PM #

          I saw this movie as well, in the broad number of asian films I’ve seen, this is one a hand full that I’ve seen that had not martial arts.

        • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 8:05 PM #

          Yes, that is an amazing film.

    • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:55 PM #

      Ah ha, someone else having web difficulties! 🙂

      • Lurker May 5, 2011 at 7:58 PM #

        I’m about to bust out the wireless card.

  15. ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 7:54 PM #

    Argh, I updated my web browser and now it keeps crashing again! Sorry for the delayed responces.

  16. Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:07 PM #

    Hi!

    Here are some asian films that are popular and sound quite interesting. Have any of u seen them?

    http://www.squidoo.com/Top-Asian-Dramas

    • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:12 PM #

      Here’s another good site.

      http://www.iidrama.com/all/2.html

    • Lurker May 5, 2011 at 8:14 PM #

      None of those for me.

      • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 8:16 PM #

        None of them for me. Well, not unless you count House of Flying Daggers on the page before!

    • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 8:16 PM #

      nope none of these for me.

      • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:22 PM #

        I have not either but I thought it was a good site to refer to if anyone is interested in other film genres.

        • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 8:31 PM #

          Those seem to be very youth and teen oriented. Does anyone act over age thirty in their recent dramas. Do they have a Bafta or Oscars over there.

          Hey I will check.

          • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 8:31 PM #

            Seems they do.

            http://goldderby.latimes.com/awards_goldderby/2007/01/honk_kong_launc.html

            • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:37 PM #

              Oh! Great find CR!

              • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 8:40 PM #

                Thanks.

              • lurker May 5, 2011 at 8:43 PM #

                Very neat, didn’t now they had awards!

                • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 8:58 PM #

                  Recently they didn’t. They seemed to be relying on the kind of buzz that was coming from our academy award foreign film categories.

                  This is amazing given how well designed, choreographed, and opulent many of their movies are.

                  • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 8:59 PM #

                    Or it did not appear that way. Hope I’m not interpretting wrong.

  17. Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 8:10 PM #

    you two aren’t the only ones with pc problems. 🙂

    • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 8:12 PM #

      *gasp* It’s a conspiracy! The internet doesn’t want us to talk about this!

      • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 8:14 PM #

        I’d so run out of the room if our pc crash at the mere mention of SWSNBN then that’s a conspiracy. LOL

        • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 8:17 PM #

          Bwahahaha! I was going to say something but it’s not professional! 🙂

        • Littlebells May 5, 2011 at 9:11 PM #

          Haha!!!! 🙂

    • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:13 PM #

      Sorry!

  18. Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:17 PM #

    Ozzie-

    Do u think it’s easy to make a martial arts period film to appeal to a wide demographic. Are martial art films really popular in the UK if so why?

    • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 8:29 PM #

      Martial art films tend to do well in the UK I think. All the popular ones mentioned in our discussion have done very well.

      As for whether it’s easy to make period martial art films that has a broad range, I don’t know. The fighting will, I guess. Help stirr up the blood and get people hooked into it! If they learn about the history as the go along (ie, who’s fighting who, why, time period and customs etc.) is a big bonus. Especially with the way some teenagers that can’t connect to a more formal study stucture.

      • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:41 PM #

        Thanks Ozzie! This is very helpful…..

  19. comic relief May 5, 2011 at 8:17 PM #

    Hope you do not think this is off topic. Do you consider Indian films Asian? I just recently started watching more Indian movies, many call them Bollywood films. Obviously many are very entertaining.

    • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 8:19 PM #

      I saw Ghajini. Despite some elements that seemed derivative of Christopher Nolan’s Memeneto it was very very entertaining. Saw it twice. Even better seemed present many of the tastes and temperaments that you see expressed in in other parts of the “third world.”

      • Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 8:23 PM #

        I don’t consider BollyWood Asian.

      • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:26 PM #

        Hmm! I have not seen that film.

        Why do u think Indian films are similar to Asian films?

        • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 8:36 PM #

          I’ve noticed in the real world, Indians seem to frequently claim Asian status.

          • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:38 PM #

            Really? Why is that?

            • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 8:44 PM #

              *sigh* Crashed again!

              Having a quick look round Indian films come under the South Asia catagory.

            • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 8:45 PM #

              I don’t know. Visually and racially they appear to be different but I thought this attribution was even more common in England.I think they’re claimimg southern asian status. I’m certainly not an expert on the topic so I’m willing to drop it.

              • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:47 PM #

                Fair enough!

    • Lurker May 5, 2011 at 8:21 PM #

      I wouldn’t consider those Asian films. But then I’m not watching Indian(Bollywood films either)

  20. Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:43 PM #

    Ozzie-

    What did u learn from writing this article that u did not know before?

    • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 8:52 PM #

      I learnt quite a bit about Japanese history. Now this is going to sound disgusting and wierd. I learnt about Seppuku, a Japanese ritual suicide. It happins in the beginning of 13 assassins, I wasn’t looking it up for fun!

      The other thing was how much influence they have had on the world. I never knew that The Magnificent Seven was based on Seven Assains. Odd co-incidence, I learnt that at the exact same time The Magnificent Seven was on TV! It was a bit of an odd look at the computer, look at tv repeatitive thing I had going on for awhile.

      • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:56 PM #

        Wow! What is Seppuku why is it performed?

  21. Parisienne May 5, 2011 at 8:45 PM #

    Everyone,

    I’m going to go for the evening. Ozzie, excellent article. It was very informative and very well written.

    • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:46 PM #

      Goodnight! Paris nice talking to u..

      • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 8:46 PM #

        night.

        • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 8:53 PM #

          Night Paris!

  22. Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:49 PM #

    Everyone-

    We have ten more minutes to our discussion tonight. Does anyone have any final Q for Ozzie?

  23. Open Book May 5, 2011 at 8:52 PM #

    Ozzie-

    I have to say I’m learning so much from your articles and what appeals to UK versus American audiences. It’s really great!!

    • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 8:54 PM #

      Really? I often assume there isn’t much difference. American culture seems to make it’s way over eventually.

      • Open Book May 5, 2011 at 9:02 PM #

        I think we have similar appetites. However, I think there are different tolerances in terms of humor, violence and sex in films is much different in the UK than in the US.

        • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 9:04 PM #

          Hmm, interesting! I know the humor can be quite different. I’ll have to pay more attention to it!

    • lurker May 5, 2011 at 8:57 PM #

      I agree with your comment.
      Thanks Ozzie, great article.

      • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 8:59 PM #

        You’re welcome!

        • comic relief May 5, 2011 at 9:00 PM #

          Thanks Ozzie.

  24. Open Book May 5, 2011 at 9:04 PM #

    Everyone- Thanks for joining the discussion tonight. Ozzie thank u!

    Goodnight!

    • ozzie20 May 5, 2011 at 9:05 PM #

      And thank you for coming too!

      Bye all!

      • comic relief May 12, 2011 at 10:54 PM #

        Ozzie,

        just saw Seven Samurai. That was a really excellent (and a very long film; it even had an intermission). The acting style was new to me, but narrative was really elaborate, the character development dynamic, and Director Akira Kurosawa absolutely lived up to his reputation. Thanks for the tip.

        • ozzie20 May 13, 2011 at 8:28 PM #

          You’re welcome. I’m glad you enjoyed it! 🙂

  25. Littlebells May 5, 2011 at 9:18 PM #

    Wow. Even if I had been around for this discussion, I would have just watched. I am not nearly as educated in Japanese films as y’all. 🙂

    Looked up seppuku. Uuuuhhhhh……that’s commitment.

    Great conversation and now I need to rent some foreign films. You are teaching me so much!!!!

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